Posts from the Motorcycles Category

How did you get into the bobber scene?

I was always around the car scene and love anything with a motor. When I first saw Son and a few of his friends riding their bobbers to a car meet, I had to know what it was. When he told me it was a Honda, I was in disbelief. I have always been one to have my hands dirty building whatever it is that I drive. I rebuilt a 67 mustang and felt like a bobber would be the perfect bike to compliment my car. What captured my interest most was that every bobber was different and that it was “built not bought.” When I got the chance to pick up a shadow of my own, I didn’t hesitate. It was bone stock and looked horrible. From the help of Son, the rest of the dudes from San Jose Bobbers, and a huge help from the internet. I began chopping metal and turning it into my own. From that moment on, I was addicted. That’s the reason I love this lifestyle.

What’s the story behind “EL BBQ”? 

I got the name “EL BBQ” by a fellow SJ Bobber, Dat. I wanted to paint my valve covers an offset color and loved the way copper looked. I went out an bought paint with good intentions, but when I finally laid the last coat..It looked horrible. I showed the guys and told them I used a BBQ grill paint…Thats when the name EL BBQ was born. The tank being red only added to the bbq theme. Lesson learned..hahaha

Compare your bobber and sport bike, what bike do you like more and why?

To me, comparing a sport bike to a bobber is like comparing apples to oranges. I have a love for everything with a motor and appreciate it for what it is. If I had to absolutely pick one over the other, it would be my bobber. Ya, going fast is fun, but you miss out on the beauty around you. When you ride a bobber, you are cruising. The speed is still there but you get to enjoy the ride. The road, the pavement, the trees, and the smell. The second reason is because I built it. Nothing gives you more satisfaction than always getting thumbs ups and the look of disbelief when you tell people you built it.

They say that riding a motorcycle with your knees in the breeze is something indescribable, can you describe it?

They say 85% of pilots ride a motorcycle. Jet pilots say riding a motorcycle is the next best thing to flying. That’s how it feels like. When you ride on a beautiful road, you can’t help but smile. You feel so free, like nothing in the world is holding you back. Just imagine being on a roller coaster but without all the ups and downs, just speed and the wind in your face. Every worry you had left when you pulled the throttle.

Why did you get a Honda? Why not a Triumph or a Norton or a “REAL” bike Harley?

I got a Honda because that’s the platform other suggested I start with. It was affordable, parts and information were plentiful. I eventually want to own other makes and model and am currently building a Yamaha xs400. Who doesn’t need more horses in their stable? Like I mentioned before, I love everything with a motor…even a lawn mower… haha JK.

Your bike is pretty loud, why is it so loud?

Loud pipes save lives!!! Being a rider for over 6 years, I really do believe loud pipes save lives. I’ve had way too many close encounters on my sportbike because they didn’t see me. When you roll by and people hear your bike, it makes them aware a motorcycle is nearby. I see it as another safety precaution. Plus, it sounds badass.

What do you hate most about riding?

The worst part about riding…..Is putting the kickstand down and getting off. The End.

Your bike has a suicide shifter, why did you choose to ride suicide and not regular?

The reason I chose to do a suicide setup is because I wanted to add another element of custom. I wanted something that would stand out against other bikes. When people compliment your bike, the suicide shifter comes as the extra surprise.

What are your future plans for the bike?

My plans as of right now is to clean it up. Give it more of a tidy look. I want to dip certain parts in copper and paint the tank black. That way it gives it that “murdered” out look but still pop with the accents being copper. Also remake my “oil tank” and hide/ clean up the wires. My bike has a long way to go and there is always something I’m going to find to want to improve.

Do you have any tips for new riders? 

The most important tip I can give to new riders is, just keep riding. Practice makes perfect but be safe. Be aware of your surroundings and never take you bike faster than you can handle. Walk before you run basically. Other then that, just hit the road and chase the setting sun.

How did you transition from a car guy into a bike guy?

Initially I sold my first car which was a Nissan 240sx (Missile Car) to get a Harley VRSCD Night rod, but like most young adults my parents disagreed and opted for me to get a new car instead. I ended up with another RWD platform to mess around with and once my credit had been established I was able to purchase my Harley. I am still a devoted car guy in the process of building the engine of my car so that I can create a drift machine. Dorifuto!

You ride with the San Jose Bobbers dudes and they all have Hondas, what made you decide to go with a Harley?

Because Murika. At first I wanted to build a shadow but I wanted something different yet still in budget. I’ve always been infatuated with Harley Davidson and their long history in the motorcycle industry. The body lines are aggressive, the displacement is impressive, and the sound is obsessive. #vtwinning.

You’re Asian, why didn’t you get a sports bike?

Eventually I hope to own one but in the meantime I need something reliable and comfortable at the same time. I commute ~100 miles a day and nothing suits long commutes like a cruiser. Once I’m more financially stable, I hope to own each type of motorcycle that would be my dream garage.

Have you had any close calls on your bike?

Plenty, just like all riders have. Being constantly exposed is the risk we take when rolling on two wheels. That’s what makes it fun. Many close calls are from riding in the rain, where visibility is at its lowest. Loud pipes really do save lives. If they can’t see you, hopefully they hear you. I do get the occasional cut offs and I just compensate with the middle finger.

What do you love most about riding?

The nonstop thrill when possibilities are endless, the smell of exhaust fumes invading your nose, the cool crisp breeze that passes through as you ride against it, the adrenaline pumping faster and faster as you roll on the throttle, the vibrations from the exhaust growling as if you are an untamed beast. The feeling of freedom, the joy and the excitement is unexplainable. You just have to ride and you’ll know the feeling. It really doesn’t matter what type or how fast your bike is. It is definitely a great feeling and that’s an understatement.

What do you hate most?

Well other than the consequences of a collision, nothing at all. I ride rain or shine.

I like how you didn’t keep your bike stock, what are your future plans for the bike?

I want to start focusing on the small details on the bike like having the bolts/nuts dipped in brass, cleaning up the handle bar assembly, new levers, new controls, internal wiring etc. I’m also debating whether or not I should go with a springer front end. For now I just want to do what I can that fits my budget but I do someday hope to turn the 73.4CI into a monstrous 90CI with the hammer performance kit.

Do you have any tips for beginners that are planning to ride? Should they buy a cheap piece of shit and fix it up or buy a new and reliable bike?

Do what you can. If you’re someone that’s mechanically inclined, then fixing an older bike will be much cheaper than fixing a new bike. There are consequences when getting an older bike such as breaking down or just things breaking so be cautious when purchasing. I love bikes new and old so for me it doesn’t matter. I only went with a new bike for the reliability. One big downfall for modifying newer bikes is the depreciation factor, if you want to hard tail or do any type of custom welding to the bike the value will drop vs when you modify an older bike the value rises (depending on how good your work is). They do have alternatives such as complete frames that way you can keep all the stock parts untouched. Know what you are getting into and get an owner’s manual. The way you treat your bike is a reflection of yourself so be patient and meticulous.